Chloe Dewe Mathews | Conflict, Time, Photography | Tate

Tate Modern’s exhibition Conflict, Time, Photography, shows the different perspectives that artists using cameras have brought to sites of conflict across the globe at different intervals of time: from images made a few moments or a day after an event, to those produced one, 10, 20, 30 and even 100 years later. London-based photographer Chloe Dewe Mathews on her work Shot at Dawn 2013:

As I stand in the 4am darkness, at the edge of an empty field in Flanders, I know that there is an absurdity to what I’m doing…Read on here.

Chloe Dewe Mathews is a photographer based in London. Shot at Dawn was commissioned by the Ruskin School of Art at the University of Oxford as part of the 14–18 NOW: WW1 Centenary Art Commissions, which tours to Edinburgh, London, Essen, Dresden, Dublin and Madrid.

Conflict, Time, Photography is on display at Tate Modern from 26 November to 15 March 2015

We are thrilled to be working on an upcoming exhibition in collaboration with Tate and Chloe Dewe Mathews titled Congregation opening at Bosse & Baum in May.

Candida Powell-Williams | Gate Theatre | Installation

Trying to go beyond 5 senses in a wig called desire (after The Lady and the Unicorn)

from Advanced Video Attribute Terminal Assembler and Recreator, an installation at the Gate Theatre, Notting Hill, on until 2nd February, 2015

Robin von Einsiedel | Chinatown | Galeria Nicodim 2015

Current exhibition, Galeria Nicodim, Bucharest. 15 January – 19 February, 2015. Review of Robin von Einsiedel’s solo exhibition Chinatown at Galeria Nicodim, Bucharest.

Robin von Einsiedel interview with Artfridge

To read the article, click here

ZOO KÖLN opens tonight!

Join us from 6pm onwards for Robin von Einsiedel’s solo exhibition at Copeland Park, 133 Copeland Road, Peckham, SE15 3SN.

How to get there click here.

We have one A2 special edition print available on request.

Left: Robin von Einsiedel, image detail

 

Candida Powell-Williams – Print available

Candida Powell-Williams, “…and I reside in the present, securely bridging the two” Diana of Themyscira, 2014. Riso print, A3, Edition of 50. £150

 

The video of Glissando performances now online!

If you missed the fantastic performances we had on during our exhibition Glissando for Art Licks Weekend, here is your chance to see them.

The wonderful Marianna Simnett produced this beautiful video for your enjoyment. Courtesy Marianna Simnett.

 

The exhibition Glissando continues until 19 October. We are open Thursday – Saturday 12 – 6pm.  Go to ‘Info’ to get directions and information on how to find us.

 

Thanks for coming to see us during Art Licks Weekend!

We had a great weekend and lots of visitors from 3 – 5 October 2014 for Art Licks Weekend. Thank you to AL for arranging all the tours with local schools and the public. Our neighbours in Peckham Gowlett Peaks, 38B, Hannah Barry, Asylum, Small White Elephant and Ladette Space hosted some great exhibitions and events, we had performances all through Saturday at our exhibition Glissando and a beautiful cake baked by our Candida Powell-Williams for the occasion, and were treated to a site-specific intervention by Lucy Joyce on the Bussey Building on Friday. Thank you to all for coming and supporting us! Hope to see you again next year…

 

Lucy Joyce in Project Visible at Tate

PROJECT VISIBLE

Exhibition opens from 2 October 2014
Clore Learning Centre, Tate Modern

Project Visible; an initiative to share some of the thinking, ideas and questions coming from the Schools Workshops programme.

During the 2013-14 academic year the workshops were led by Katriona Beales, Harald den Breejen, Evan Ifekoya, Lucy Joyce, Emma McGarry, Rosanna Mclaughlin, Joseph Noonan-Ganley, Elaine Reynolds, Eoghan Ryan and Katharine Tolladay.

Call out for dancers!

Dancers:

Dancers are required for Glissando, a new exhibition by Candida Powell-Williams. We are looking to cast three dancers based on the characters of Elimer, an 11th century monk who made himself wings and Christina the Astonishing, a 13th century woman with supernatural powers who will be recast as Wonder Woman.

The exhibition comprises installation, sculpture and props, within an environment evocative of a utopian theatrical installation, which presents a historical journey through human’s desire to fly: real technological attempts and mechanical shortfalls.

We are seeking dancers for the duration of the opening night and a day-long performance. This might extend to two further evening performances. We are looking to cast 3 dancers in the role of the mythological and fictional characters. The role of the dancers is to activate the exhibition through a series of choreographed movements and routines, experimenting with the objects for example cracking open sculptures to reveal colourful interiors, toppling objects and discarding their costumes.

Key Dates

Sunday 14 September 2014: Deadline for applications

Wednesday 17 September 2014: Evening casting sessions.

29 and 30 September 2014: Rehearsals to take place over these days.

2 October, 4-9pm; Saturday 4 October 2014, 10am-6pm: The full cast perform a choreographed routine at intervals during the open evening and a special day-long event timed to coincide with Art Licks Weekend.

Fee on application.

Contact lana@bosseandbaum.com or alexandra@bosseandbaum.com to apply

Art Licks Weekend programme announced!

Bosse & Baum are delighted to be included in this year’s AL Weekend programme with Candida Powell-Williams’ exhibition ‘Glissando’ in our space in Peckham.

More info on the exhibition can be found on our website.

Weekend and daytime tours will be taking place from Friday 3rd to Sunday 5th October and we’ll be open from 12 – 6pm throughout the weekend.

Come and see us for the PV on Thursday 2 October, 6-9pm and don’t miss the performances.

Check out Art Licks for more events taking place that weekend here.

Talk: Bosse & Baum on curating with artist Lauren Kelly

Bosse & Baum have been invited by Griffin Gallery to talk about curating. Come along to hear about our work on 20th May, 6.30 – 8.30pm, with a Q&A with Lauren Kelly after.

More details here.

Inside Lauren Kelly’s studio

We are very excited to be installing Lauren Kelly’s exhibition Digesting the Devoured at the amazing Dog Eared Film Studios, in King’s Cross, this weekend.

Come down and see the site-specific work at the PV this coming Friday 11th April 2014, 6pm – 9pm.

Panel : Griselda Pollock, Rebecca Fortnum + more

To celebrate our upcoming exhibition with Lauren Kelly, we have invited the legendary art historian Griselda Pollock, the great writer Rebecca Fortnum, the fabulous artists Denise de Cordova and Rachael Champion to speak about gender and contemporary sculpture with Lauren Kelly. Places are limited so don’t miss out and book now!

Wed 9 April 2014 // Dog Eared Films Studios,25-28 Field Street, King’s Cross // 6.30pm – 8.30pm
To book email: info@bosseandbaum.com

Lucy Joyce in new exhibition TECHNOPOLIS

We are very excited that Lucy Joyce, whose new work we are showing as part of the exhibition HACKING SPACES – PV 6 FEB in collaboration with Orproject is also part of a group show TECHNOPOLIS, which opens at the Departure Foundation tonight!

TECHNOPOLIS at Departure Foundation, 55 Gracechurch Street
PV / 23 Jan / 6-9 PM
Exhibition continues until 26 January 2014

The music video TECHNOPOLIS (1979) by pioneering Japanese techno band Yellow Magic Orchestra becomes a catalyst for an exhibition of new and recent works by London based artists in 2014.

Interview with Daniel Bragin

BB:  What are your beginnings as an artist?  Was there a definitive moment that made you realise that you were an artist?

DB: Well I have started to paint graffiti when I was 14 years old.  I never considerered that I’m an artist when I was fucking up the trains and walls.  I think it had more to with doing something that you like, it was not the ”graffiti art ” it’s action and the whole game related to graffiti in the 90’s . I don’t not how a artist should feel, I do see things…. there is no definitive moment so far as I know I just do my thing something that I like to….. nowadays we call it art, is it because I did the RCA ? I’m just a human being that has a strong interest in expression and reflection on issues.

BB:  The way most people see artwork today is online, do you think of this when you are making work and how do you think this changes the relationship between the viewer and art?
DB: I know I do it too, we adapt to circumstances we live in.  To be honest I don’t think about the virtual world at all when I make work, of course you can’t compare the real thing with something you see on your bright and shiny iPad. But how is it if I have to see the Mona Lisa in Louvre, she is behind the perspex, well that is too extreme example but that is life. Of course it changes if it’s the physical presence of what ever you see in real life. I’m sure you are not scared of the mad rhino when you see it on your TV but that will change the case when you will see it for real…. run darling run I hope it’s not a hungry mad rhino.

BB: Materials seem to play a large role in your work (fur, gold and glass).  Tells me more about your fascination with materially?

DB: Yes, yes the material. I like it a lot to work with different materials by doing that I don’t feel any limitation. Most of the time I don’t get bored because of the wide range of possibility’s and choice. Well I think each material has its’ own character  and personality, so I really like to move various materials out of the original context or mix it up with something….. I can call it manipulation of the reality, so far the reality is real…..(I mean the rhino on TV).

BB: Describe the relationship between your photographic and sculptural work?

DB: Photographs, are one of the mechanisms of the ”art” processes that lead to something. The relationship is that the snapshot looks real, but its nothing more than a fixation of the moment and a detail of the past. It’s more or less like paintings the story is happening inside the boundaries of the frame.

BB: What artists or movements have influenced you most?

DB: I just can’t say that I have a favourite one. I do like Martin Creed,  especially his songs, they are amazing. The props made by Matthew Barney, are fascinating as well.  I also like the 99p store and the Poundworld I would be very happy to hear if one of the contemporary artist was behind the concept.

BB: Has living and working in London changed the sort of work you are making?
DB:  I think it’s London and a fact that I have became a father that made me see thing a bit different than before.

In terms of London…. things change without even being aware of it. I call it mental unconscious pollution.

You can’t avoid it so far you can see, smell and hear things…. I love London !
BB:  Tell me about any unrealised or upcoming projects?

DB:  I would love to but I can’t, I’m not that far yet…. there are things going on for sure.

BB: You briefly mentioned your adverse reaction to reading the £12 Million Stuffed Shark.  What do you think about working in the contemporary art market and do you think you consider the art market while making new work?

DB: Well the book is fine and it sure is good to know how thing go. But I think you don’t have to take it to serious, to avoid nightmares or any other funny dreams. I don’t know if I think about the art market.   I don’t think so because I’m not in the market game.

BB: I was watching this programme on Cornelia Parker and she said that she thought all sculpture was inherently violent because of the physical process.  Do you think this is true for your own work?

DB:  Well if you compare sculpture with painting or drawing, she is right. It can be true but it all depends on the work.

Daniel Bragin is showing a new body of work at upcoming show SLUSH with Bosse & Baum.

10 – 12 Exhibition Road, SW7 2HF
Exhibition 3 – 14 October 2013
PV Wednesday 2 October 6-9PM

Interview with Anton Burdakov

B&B: Was there a definitive moment when you decided to become an artist?
AB: I became obsessed with painting when I was about 14. Later on, when I was studying neuroscience for my BA, which was really interesting, I realised that I still got bigger kicks out of art.

BB: How has studying neuroscience influenced your work as an artist?

AB: It made me more comfortable with chaos and the absence of explanations, the irrational stuff.

BB: Tell me about your work and the ideas behind your upcoming show with Bosse & Baum called Tiger Tiger?

AB: It’s a lot to do with a kind of yearning, which I am exploring through ambiguity between reality and representation. All works in the show are both familiar things in themselves and representations of something else. For me, the yearning for a different reality is very much connected with different places, so there is a clear architectural theme. This is also felt in the exhibition space, which is like a puzzle which doesn’t quite add up.
All works are new, especially the Plans. I stopped painting five years ago, and suddenly it became relevant again – I guess because they are not really paintings. They are architectural floor plans sketched out with paint on board. The decisions are made according to what kind of places they could become. There is always a narrative in my head as I work on them, so they are not only plans, but plans of action. They deal with arrival and discovery, the beginnings of new life stories.

BB: How do you see the relationship between your sculptural and photographic work?

AB: I only take photographs of installations I make, and of the events around them. So they are documentary and autobiographical but at the same time images which can exist independently. And in my three-dimensional work, I often take great care with single points of view, which is similar to working with images.

BB: Has curating your first group show (Must-Have, art:i:curate at Ligne Roset City, London) informed or changed the type of work that you are currently making?

AB: I wouldn’t say it changed my work, but I learned a lot about exhibition-making and how much the context in which works are exhibited becomes part of the work.

BB:  What artists or movements most influence your work?

AB:  It changes all the time – and sometimes you don’t want to admit it even to yourself! Last year I was into the photographs of Hiroshi Sugimoto and William Eggleston. And just a few days ago, at this year’s Frieze Masters, I saw an amazing Brueghel (the Younger).

BB: The way most people see artwork today is online, do you think of this when you are making work and how do you think this changes the relationship between the viewer with the works?

AB: I think the key thing is that  means as images this is a theme I work with a lot. Every image is a world which can be ‘inhabited’. But I dont specifically think about how my work will be seen online.

BB: What projects do you have planned for the months ahead?

AB:  The idea is not so formed yet, but I would like to do a follow up project to Komplex IV, which I did for a residency in northern Germany over a year ago. It was a real challenge, there was a team of nine people helping me and a real sense of purpose. This joint effort, with all its conflicts, doubts and hopes was for me the main theme, and there is a series of photographs based on that. I don’t want to repeat it, but to do something which re-shuffles the same ingredients in a new way.

JocJonJosch / Hand in Foot / Musee d’art du Valais

Musee d’art du Valais, Sion is pleased to present the delivery of the Prix cultural Manor Sion to JocJonJosch. The collective are doing a weekend of performances, until 1 December 2013, to mark the occasion of their exhibition at the museum.

Bosse & Baum have followed the boys to Sion, Switzerland to support them at their PV this evening, where they will be doing a series of live performances over the course of the evening. Video and photography work will also be on show at the exhibition.

The exhibition is project managed by our dear friend STEPHANIE LUGON, and is accompanied by a beautiful catalogue designed by Sarah Boris, which includes essays by Jo Melvin, Andrei Pop, Siri Peyer, Rye Dag Holmboe and poet John James.